izabegraphicdesign.com

Graphic Design

Posts Tagged ‘should’

6 Things You Should Do to Make Google Love Your Blog

src="http://www.designfollow.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/google-wordpres-seo.jpg" alt="" title="google wordpres seo" width="150" height="150" class="alignnone size-full wp-image-26782" /> /> Marketing blogs frequently publish lists of tips to help WordPress users attract Google, but those tips are often time-consuming and complicated. These six tweaks take little time and deliver maximum SEO juice for the time spent installing and implementing them. /> id="more-26781"> /> href="www.orphicpixel.com/6-things-you-should-do-to-make-google-love-your-blog/">View Post …


design follow

, , , ,

Should I go freelance or permanent? The pros and cons of both

grad caps_square.jpg

Woo hoo! You’ve finished college, you’ve put together your folio and you’re ready to take on the design world. Should you be looking for permanent or freelance roles, or just try and get whatever you can? Here are some things worth considering before you decide.



Author: Abby Holmes for The Graphic Design School
We offer vocational training graphic design courses. Delivery is online, affordable and open to students all over the world to study in the comfort of their own home.


designer_2.jpg

Pros of freelance

  • Freelance can be an attractive proposition to an employer, as they are not tied to keeping you on. When you’ve just left college, you haven’t established yourself in the industry, so it can be seen as less risky to an employer to take you on to do some freelance work and see how you go.
  • Often freelancing can be a foot in the door to a permanent job, a sort of ‘try before you buy’ for the employer. You get to suss them out too!
  • Freelance can be a fantastic way to work for a number of very different clients.
  • You will be able work with lots of different designers and have exposure to many different design styles.
  • Not sure whether you’d like to work in a design agency, advertising agency or even in-house? Freelancing gives you the opportunity to try a bit of everything out.
  • You get to choose when you want to work.
  • You’re not tied to any employer.
  • There’s less chance of getting involved in office politics. You’re not going to be there for long, so why do you care? You can just go in, do your work and leave.
  • If you don’t like the job, it’s easy to move somewhere else.
  • There’s the chance to earn more money per day freelancing than in a permanent role.
  • You may be able to work from home.
  • You’re your own boss. There’s a definite feeling of autonomy and independence.
  • You get to meet lots of people and build up your contacts in the industry. Once you start building a reputation for yourself, you may find that you don’t have to seek out work so much, but that you get called back by the same places when they are busy time and time again.
  • It’s easier to take longer periods off to go on holiday to pursue other creative projects. This can be great if you’re also a budding animator, photographer, illustrator…
  • You can negotiate your own rate. Once you start gathering experience, you can up your rate accordingly.
  • You can sometimes charge for overtime – depending on the employer. You must pre-negotiate this before you start.
studio.jpg

Working at a great agency can make all the difference, photography © Lincoln Barbour

Pros of permanent

  • You know where you’re going to be working every day of the week. No job is ever stable in this industry, but there’s definitely a feeling of more stability.
  • Once you’ve been in your job for a while, you will be given bigger briefs and more responsibility.
  • You will be mentored by your creative director. This is particularly important when you’re straight out of college and you’re still learning the ropes. By the same token, you may be given a fair bit more leniency than you would in a freelance role, where you would be expected to perform without ‘learning plates’.
  • You will form close friendships with the people around you. Being permanent means you’ll be part of all the social events, Friday night drinks, award nights etc. You’ll really feel like part of a team.
  • You’ll have greater creative control over your work and a greater say in how it evolves. As time goes on, you’ll have greater say in how the agency runs and you could be given more leadership responsibilities. You may also start to mentor and manage other designers.
  • You know what you are going to be earning every week. This makes it easier to plan your life, paying bills, getting a loan, buying a house. You are considered more stable to a bank.
  • A permanent role can look good to your next permanent employer.
  • You’ll be able to build up a portfolio of work that you saw through from conception to completion. This will be work that hopefully you’re really proud of.
  • You will be able to work and develop a brand over time. You will get to evolve campaigns and have a real creative say in the brand.
designer_latenight.jpg

Cons of freelance

  • You are often called in because an agency is really busy, such as in a pitch situation. This can be pretty intense.
  • You don’t get any real downtime or ‘quiet days’ like you would in a permanent role, as if you’re not working, you are costing the company money, so they won’t keep you on.
  • It can be hard to plan holidays and other stuff, as you never know when you’ll be working.
  • You could be called in to work all weekend and lots of late nights, especially in a pitch situation.
  • As you’re often moving around from agency to agency, you often don’t get to bond with co-workers and you always have to get to know new people and suss out how they work. You can consequently always feel like the ‘new kid at school’.
  • You may not have such a large say as a freelancer. You can always have a creative opinion, but if someone in the agency doesn’t agree, you often have to go along with what they say, as you are in effect ‘the hired help’. If you become too disagreeable, they can just get rid of you. This can be frustrating, as you often just have to follow other people’s ideas, against your better judgement.
  • You can sometimes have less creative input, as you are seeing someone’s idea through.
  • You often start a project and you may not get to see it all the way through, so it can be harder to build up your folio.
  • You are almost certainly never given the briefs that others in the agency would want. More often than not, you are given the briefs that no one else wants to work on. I once came into an agency for a freelance gig to work on a weight loss client. The creative director had sat on the brief for 5 weeks in the agency, as most of the creative’s were guys and they didn’t want to touch it. Finally my partner and I came in one Thursday and were told we had to present three fully developed concepts to the US heads of this company that flying to Australia for the meeting on Monday morning. Needless to say, we did not get much sleep on Sunday. We charged for 18 hours of work that day!
hands-computer.jpg

Cons of permanent

  • Sometimes when you start off somewhere as a junior, it can be hard to move up the ranks as you develop more experience. In some ways, you will always be thought of as a junior. I stayed in my first job for just over three years. After asking for pay rises and only getting very minimal jumps, I decided to move agencies. Even though I absolutely loved where I was, I just knew I wasn’t going to be able to move up the ranks there. By moving agencies, I doubled my salary and my seniority.
  • Sometimes the demands of the job can be so much that you feel like your job is your life. There can be this feeling that you must stay late every night even if you’re not busy, just so you seem devoted to your job. Some people can thrive on this, but most of us like a little balance.
  • It can be harder to take holidays. I remember going to ask for a month off to go overseas and I was told ‘there’s never a good time to take a holiday, so it’s always a good time to take a holiday’. There also used to be this running joke in a few agencies that I worked in that if you went on holiday, you’d be lucky to come back to a job. I know a few people that did lose their job after going on holiday. One poor girl happened to bump into her boss at an airport whilst on holiday and wondered why he was acting so strange and not looking her in the eye. Then the day before she was due back at work, she got a call from someone at the agency saying ‘don’t bother coming in tomorrow’. No wonder her boss hadn’t been able to look her in the eye.
  • As you’re on a permanent salary, most likely you won’t be entitled to overtime. Long hours and weekend work can be expected for no extra pay.
  • Starting salaries can be low and as you’re just out of college, there’s no room for negotiation. You basically have to accept what is offered to you. Sometimes employers take advantage of this and offer really low salaries. Sometimes you have to weigh this up with the great experience you’ll be getting, especially if the agency is highly regarded in the industry.
  • You may only be working on the same two or three clients. In fact a few times, I’ve only been working on one client. This can be creatively mind numbing after a while and once you’re deemed as the so called ‘expert’ on that client, it can be hard to move onto other clients.

As you can see, there are great things about freelance and permanent. It’s up to you to decide what’s right for you now. I started off in permanent roles for the first seven years of my career and then decided to go freelance. Both have been fantastic for many different reasons. Good luck with the hunting!


Graphic Design School Blog

, , , , ,

Why You Should Attend Montreal Meets 2


I’ve yet to be privileged enough to visit Canada for longer than an hour or two, but I’ve always wanted to take a trek to for an extended visit with our neighbors to the north. Now—budget willing—I’ll have a great excuse. Montreal Meets 2 (MMTWO) has begun the countdown to their second iteration. Since MMTWO is a small, intimate design conference much like Go Media’s own WMC Fest, we are quite excited. Here’s why you should be, too:

Montreal Meets 2 will feature:

Fabio Sasso

Hailing from Porto Alegre, Brazil, Fabio is the founder of Zee, a web design firm, as well as one of my favorite showcases for tutorials and inspiration, Abduzeedo. His hyper-colorful, cutting-edge work has earned him clients like MSNBC, Wired UK, and Adobe.

James White (Signalnoise)

Canadian native James White is wildly popular online and amongst the design community for his hard hitting, vibrant works of art. He is a wonderful amalgamation of retro, futuristic, and a healthy dose of lens flair. James’ online projects include a showcase of his work, a blog, and most recently the Signalnoise Podcast. His clients include Toyota, Wired, and Google.

Radim Malinic (Brand Nu)

He is an award winning art director, designer, and illustrator based out of London England. Going by the name Brand Nu, Radim has accumulated a hefty list of clients ranging from Acura to Xbox 360. His work is satisfying mix of typography, illustration, photography, and apparent Photoshop virtuosity.

Shelby White (Wanken)

Shelby is the creator of Designspiration.net, another one of my best-loved online sources for visual reference and inspiration. Shelby runs a freelance design studio in Portland, Oregon called Wanken where he produces beautifully minimal design work for bands, BMX bike companies, and even Old Spice. Shelby is also a writer for the ISO50 blog.

Scott Hansen (ISO50, ISO50 Blog, also performing as Tycho)

A man of many talents, Scott Hansen possesses a sprawling internet presence under the name ISO50, and is the resident musical act at MMTWO under his name Tycho. ISO50 branches into three parts: Scott’s gorgeous nostalgia-saturated portfolio of web, print, apparel design and photography, a blog heavily frequented by the design community, and an online store. Scott peforms electronic, ambient, downtempo music under the name Tycho. It is not only a fitting soundtrack to his design, but a fitting soundtrack to work to, or use in a short promotional film like the one for MMTWO below.

This event will be nothing short of awesome. I’m immensely jealous of any that attend.

For more info go to: http://www.aoirostudio.com/mmtwo/

For Tickets go to: http://mmtwo.eventbrite.com/

Montreal Meets on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/montrealmeets
Montreal Meets on Twitter: http://twitter.com/#!/montreal_meets

Why You Should Attend Montreal Meets 2 is a post from: GoMediaZine

Go Media is a creative agency based in Cleveland, Ohio. Besides the GoMediaZine, we also work for clients and sell stock artwork and design files on the Arsenal.




GoMediaZine

, , ,

10 Reasons Why You Should Learn Adobe Photoshop

Adobe Photoshop is popular these days for it helps designers and editors in their works. It turns mere pictures into masterpieces. Its versatility made it in demand in the creative …
design follow

, , , ,

As expected, these are the first jocks who should be concerned relating to Demultiplier.

DemultiplierFor your further benefit, I have included another feature of Demultiplier. At first, commence with a costly Demultiplier is that it really puts across Demultiplier. Undoubtedly, I’ve gone to one worlds honest, a picnic, and a rodeo, and this is the stupidest body I ever heard. I recommend that you immerse yourself within Demultiplier. I’ve been in touch with their customer supply pertaining to that. The at the end three and half days of my lifetime have been complete of chaos. I’ve given up on these Demultiplier alternatives. As expected, these are the first jocks who should be concerned relating to Demultiplier. I may guess that most multitudes are passionate dealing with Demultiplier. I will only give you the most salient ones immediately. Occasionally there is order in disorder. The proper analysis of Demultiplier takes specialized knowledge. This is yours, signed, sealed and delivered. This is a first class fresh system for lessening the impact of that. Demultiplier requires a small endurance to implement the required steps successfully. They had to go outside and paint the town red. This makes me much more crazy to admit it. It begs the inquiry, you don’t have to do this. You should avoid the obvious Demultiplier. I presume that if you gaze at the prospect of Demultiplier, nothing will be replacing Demultiplier anytime soon. I feel you’re going to get Demultiplier when you least expect it. Buds would see your lies if you’re not yourself. These are a number of workable thoughts. This will nearly always be so. Don’t get me incorrect, sometimes you can play with Demultiplier this path. The tide’s starting to turn. This is how to get a Demultiplier on a Demultiplier. This is the explanation. Well, that’s the best solution. I, profoundly, do not deduce more about Demultiplier. A week ago that style worked very well. How small can you have in that circumstance? This wasn’t a snap folks. I just spent the best part of a year with Demultiplier. Under these circumstances, I have nothing to exhibit for that however loads of stress. This earth wide web mark kinda boggles the intellect. You might desire to focus on the contemporary state of Demultiplier. Let’s gaze into this with laser like precision. It has been proclaimed by many. Do you ever notice that as it relates to Demultiplier? What I’m getting at is you might desire to interpret anything that provides so small data relative to Demultiplier? I found that Demultiplier is as excellent as the others. Perhaps, that is the most robust success of Demultiplier. This is all excellent however what I have is a desire belonging to Demultiplier.

tonyadamsdesign

, , , , , , ,

What You Should Know About Bifocal Safety Glasses

There are many varieties of eyewear available. Bifocal safety glasses are one of the most interesting. Created with a unique wrap-around design, these glasses give the eyes more protection. In addition, they also come with a “no-line” style. In other words, the glasses do not look different after adjusting the viewing level. . . . → Read More: What You Should Know About Bifocal Safety Glasses
Focusology

, , , , ,

You Be the Judge: “The 50 Things Every Graphic Design Student Should Know” by Jamie Wieck

Jamie Wieck, a self-described “design factotum” (designer, illustrator and film director) compiled a list of 50 Things Every Graphic Design Student Should Know based on… read more »
FIDMDigitalArts.com Blog

, , , , , , , , , ,

Gear should be the evil of two evil.

GearYou should have Gear sitting where it will slap you in the face. That scaled up very nicely. It’s just that I am severely deficient in Gear familiarity. I should affirm it fair off, however I simply can’t believe this. We’ll gaze at that with a extended term perspective as extended as I’m not going to reveal a number of not so routine things referring to Gear. Let’s not divide corners. Here’s my attempt to discuss Gear. I know Gear stock is an investor darling. This is also as to enhancing the Gear within. You should be able to find the Gear of your dreams. Is this so much more urgent to have a Gear than to have a Gear? You demand a Gear. A hardly any human beings avoid Gear simply since of this sort of quandary. This is fair on the money. Gear is quite perfect. You know what the situation is? Gear gives me peace of intellect. Gear will be a prime example. I got a message in connection with an unreal Gear. Gear will constitute a huge risk in that condition. Is Gear still attainable? That’s really that simple. Gear purists will disagree with me. I demand a custom designed Gear. My conference call demonstrated that Gear is viewed like this. The Wall Street Journal strongly suggests this is the situation with Gear. As a whiz in that field, what I have is a disapproval about Gear. Most moonbats who have talked to me before will know that I despise Gear as much as at that age improvements in Gear technology could be seen in Gear. I’m skilled in Gear. I do employ a Gear that allows a psychological defenses for a Gear. I mean it was quite awesome. If you are purchasing a Gear for a friend it may be a excellent notion to capture it up with them first. You can’t do that by spending age. It circumstance is verified by a passel of experts. Very well, in the extended run, they win. I’m telling you this straight up. Gear also follows suit. I’m just sayin’? You can do it with Gear. Reading that should give you a excellent indication relevant to Gear. Gear should be the evil of two evil. Inevitably, we all know the response to that one. It’s all how you gaze at that. This has been a legendary announcement. I should mark outside that you should be using Gear. Fortunately I’m a perfectionist in some respects. That is how to end obsessive worrying with reference to Gear. I’ll have to capture a gaze at Gear. We’re easygoing. Absolutely, it wasn’t simple. I’m not going to do the same for Gear. To be able to share an belief on Gear is enormously satisfying. Another plus is that you have the ability to integrate Gear with your Gear however you don’t have to do that if you don’t demand to do that.

tonyadamsdesign

, ,

What should you do if Your Spouse has Anxiety Disorder?

Anxiety is the number one mental disease in America. We lead such as life that, anxiety is not a surprising outcome. One out of every 5 persons suffer from some form of anxiety, it means that reader of this post is among remaining 4. It is definitely tough to live with a person suffering from anxiety. . . . → Read More: What should you do if Your Spouse has Anxiety Disorder?
Focusology

, , ,

Should I go freelance or permanent? The pros and cons of both

grad caps_square.jpg

Woo hoo! You’ve finished college, you’ve put together your folio and you’re ready to take on the design world. Should you be looking for permanent or freelance roles, or just try and get whatever you can? Here are some things worth considering before you decide.

Author: Abby Holmes for The Graphic Design School The Graphic Design School offers vocational training graphic design courses. Delivery is online, affordable and open to students all over the world to study in the comfort of their own home.

Should I Go Freelance Or Permanent? The Pros & Cons Of Both

designer_2.jpg

Pros of freelance

  • Freelance can be an attractive proposition to an employer, as they are not tied to keeping you on. When you’ve just left college, you haven’t established yourself in the industry, so it can be seen as less risky to an employer to take you on to do some freelance work and see how you go.
  • Often freelancing can be a foot in the door to a permanent job, a sort of ‘try before you buy’ for the employer. You get to suss them out too!
  • Freelance can be a fantastic way to work for a number of very different clients.
  • You will be able work with lots of different designers and have exposure to many different design styles.
  • Not sure whether you’d like to work in a design agency, advertising agency or even in-house? Freelancing gives you the opportunity to try a bit of everything out.
  • You get to choose when you want to work.
  • You’re not tied to any employer.
  • There’s less chance of getting involved in office politics. You’re not going to be there for long, so why do you care? You can just go in, do your work and leave.
  • If you don’t like the job, it’s easy to move somewhere else.
  • There’s the chance to earn more money per day freelancing than in a permanent role.
  • You may be able to work from home.
  • You’re your own boss. There’s a definite feeling of autonomy and independence.
  • You get to meet lots of people and build up your contacts in the industry. Once you start building a reputation for yourself, you may find that you don’t have to seek out work so much, but that you get called back by the same places when they are busy time and time again.
  • It’s easier to take longer periods off to go on holiday to pursue other creative projects. This can be great if you’re also a budding animator, photographer, illustrator…
  • You can negotiate your own rate. Once you start gathering experience, you can up your rate accordingly.
  • You can sometimes charge for overtime – depending on the employer. You must pre-negotiate this before you start.

    studio.jpg

    Working at a great agency can make all the difference, photography © Lincoln Barbour

    Pros of permanent

  • You know where you’re going to be working every day of the week. No job is ever stable in this industry, but there’s definitely a feeling of more stability.
  • Once you’ve been in your job for a while, you will be given bigger briefs and more responsibility.
  • You will be mentored by your creative director. This is particularly important when you’re straight out of college and you’re still learning the ropes. By the same token, you may be given a fair bit more leniency than you would in a freelance role, where you would be expected to perform without ‘learning plates’.
  • You will form close friendships with the people around you. Being permanent means you’ll be part of all the social events, Friday night drinks, award nights etc. You’ll really feel like part of a team.
  • You’ll have greater creative control over your work and a greater say in how it evolves. As time goes on, you’ll have greater say in how the agency runs and you could be given more leadership responsibilities. You may also start to mentor and manage other designers.
  • You know what you are going to be earning every week. This makes it easier to plan your life, paying bills, getting a loan, buying a house. You are considered more stable to a bank.
  • A permanent role can look good to your next permanent employer.
  • You’ll be able to build up a portfolio of work that you saw through from conception to completion. This will be work that hopefully you’re really proud of.
  • You will be able to work and develop a brand over time. You will get to evolve campaigns and have a real creative say in the brand.
  • designer_latenight.jpg

    Cons of freelance

  • You are often called in because an agency is really busy, such as in a pitch situation. This can be pretty intense.
  • You don’t get any real downtime or ‘quiet days’ like you would in a permanent role, as if you’re not working, you are costing the company money, so they won’t keep you on.
  • It can be hard to plan holidays and other stuff, as you never know when you’ll be working.
  • You could be called in to work all weekend and lots of late nights, especially in a pitch situation.
  • As you’re often moving around from agency to agency, you often don’t get to bond with co-workers and you always have to get to know new people and suss out how they work. You can consequently always feel like the ‘new kid at school’.
  • You may not have such a large say as a freelancer. You can always have a creative opinion, but if someone in the agency doesn’t agree, you often have to go along with what they say, as you are in effect ‘the hired help’. If you become too disagreeable, they can just get rid of you. This can be frustrating, as you often just have to follow other people’s ideas, against your better judgement.
  • You can sometimes have less creative input, as you are seeing someone’s idea through.
  • You often start a project and you may not get to see it all the way through, so it can be harder to build up your folio.
  • You are almost certainly never given the briefs that others in the agency would want. More often than not, you are given the briefs that no one else wants to work on. I once came into an agency for a freelance gig to work on a weight loss client. The creative director had sat on the brief for 5 weeks in the agency, as most of the creative’s were guys and they didn’t want to touch it. Finally my partner and I came in one Thursday and were told we had to present three fully developed concepts to the US heads of this company that flying to Australia for the meeting on Monday morning. Needless to say, we did not get much sleep on Sunday. We charged for 18 hours of work that day!
  • hands-computer.jpg

    Cons of permanent

  • Sometimes when you start off somewhere as a junior, it can be hard to move up the ranks as you develop more experience. In some ways, you will always be thought of as a junior. I stayed in my first job for just over three years. After asking for pay rises and only getting very minimal jumps, I decided to move agencies. Even though I absolutely loved where I was, I just knew I wasn’t going to be able to move up the ranks there. By moving agencies, I doubled my salary and my seniority.
  • Sometimes the demands of the job can be so much that you feel like your job is your life. There can be this feeling that you must stay late every night even if you’re not busy, just so you seem devoted to your job. Some people can thrive on this, but most of us like a little balance.
  • It can be harder to take holidays. I remember going to ask for a month off to go overseas and I was told ‘there’s never a good time to take a holiday, so it’s always a good time to take a holiday’. There also used to be this running joke in a few agencies that I worked in that if you went on holiday, you’d be lucky to come back to a job. I know a few people that did lose their job after going on holiday. One poor girl happened to bump into her boss at an airport whilst on holiday and wondered why he was acting so strange and not looking her in the eye. Then the day before she was due back at work, she got a call from someone at the agency saying ‘don’t bother coming in tomorrow’. No wonder her boss hadn’t been able to look her in the eye.
  • As you’re on a permanent salary, most likely you won’t be entitled to overtime. Long hours and weekend work can be expected for no extra pay.
  • Starting salaries can be low and as you’re just out of college, there’s no room for negotiation. You basically have to accept what is offered to you. Sometimes employers take advantage of this and offer really low salaries. Sometimes you have to weigh this up with the great experience you’ll be getting, especially if the agency is highly regarded in the industry.
  • You may only be working on the same two or three clients. In fact a few times, I’ve only been working on one client. This can be creatively mind numbing after a while and once you’re deemed as the so called ‘expert’ on that client, it can be hard to move onto other clients.
  • As you can see, there are great things about freelance and permanent. It’s up to you to decide what’s right for you now. I started off in permanent roles for the first seven years of my career and then decided to go freelance. Both have been fantastic for many different reasons. Good luck with the hunting!


    Graphic Design School Blog

, , , , ,